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Chapter 1: Energy in Thermal Physics

Expert-verified
An Introduction to Thermal Physics
Pages: 1 - 48
An Introduction to Thermal Physics

An Introduction to Thermal Physics

Book edition 1st
Author(s) Daniel V. Schroeder
Pages 356 pages
ISBN 9780201380279

77 Questions for Chapter 1: Energy in Thermal Physics

  1. A mole is approximately the number of protons in a gram of protons. The mass of a neutron is about the same as the mass of a proton, while the mass of an electron is usually negligible in comparison, so if you know the total number of protons and neutrons in a molecule(i,e., its "atomic mass"), you know the approximate mass(in grams) of a mole of these molecules. Referring to the periodic table at the back of this book ,find the mass of a mole of each of the following : Water, nitrogen (N2), lead, quartz (Si O2)

    Found on Page 8
  2. Calculate the rms speed of a nitrogen molecule at a room temperature?

    Found on Page 13
  3. Suppose you have a gas containing hydrogen molecules and oxygen molecules, in thermal equilibrium. Which molecule are moving faster, on average? By what factor?

    Found on Page 13
  4. The Rankine temperature scale(abbreviated ) uses the same scale size degrees as Fahrenheit, but measured up from absolute zero like Kelvin(so Rankine is to Fahrenheit as Kelvin is to Celsius). Find the conversion formula between Rankine and Fahrenheit and also between Rankine and Kelvin. What is the room temperature on the Rankine scale?

    Found on Page 5
  5. Uranium has two common isotopes, with atomic masses of 238 and 235. one way to separate these isotopes is to combine the uranium with fluorine to make uranium hexafluoride gas, UF6, then exploit the difference in the average thermal speeds of molecules containing the different isotopes. Calculate the rms speed of each molecule at room temperature, and compare them.

    Found on Page 13
  6. Does it ever make sense to say that one object is "twice as hot" as another? Does it matter whether one is referring to Celsius or Kelvin temperatures? Explain.

    Found on Page 5
  7. The Fahrenheit temperature scale is defined so that ice melts at 320 F and water boils at 2120 F.

    Found on Page 5
  8. Estimate the average temperature of the air inside a hot-air balloon (see Figure 1.1). Assume that the total mass of the unfilled balloon and payload is 500 kg. What is the mass of the air inside the balloon?

    Found on Page 8
  9. Even at low density, real gases don’t quite obey the ideal gas law. A systematic way to account for deviations from ideal behavior is the virial

    Found on Page 9
  10. Calculate the rms speed of a nitrogen molecule at room temperature.

    Found on Page 13

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