Select your language

Suggested languages for you:
Log In Start studying!
Answers without the blur. Just sign up for free and you're in → Illustration

Chapter 5: Free Energy and Chemical Thermodynamics

Expert-verified
An Introduction to Thermal Physics
Pages: 149 - 219
An Introduction to Thermal Physics

An Introduction to Thermal Physics

Book edition 1st
Author(s) Daniel V. Schroeder
Pages 356 pages
ISBN 9780201380279

105 Questions for Chapter 5: Free Energy and Chemical Thermodynamics

  1. Let the system be one mole of argon gas at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Compute the total energy (kinetic only, neglecting atomic rest energies), entropy, enthalpy, Helmholtz free energy, and Gibbs free energy. Express all answers in SI units.

    Found on Page 152
  2. Use a Maxwell relation from the previous problem and the third law of thermodynamics to prove that the thermal expansion coefficient (defined in Problem 1.7) must be zero at T=0.

    Found on Page 159
  3. The formula for derived in the previous problem can also be derived starting with the definitions of these quantities in terms of U and H. Do so. Most of the derivation is very similar, but at one point you need to use the relation .

    Found on Page 159
  4. Imagine that you drop a brick on the ground and it lands with a thud. Apparently the energy of this system tends to spontaneously decrease. Explain why.

    Found on Page 163
  5. In the previous section I derived the formula . Explain why this formula makes intuitive sense, by discussing graphs of F vs. V with different slopes.

    Found on Page 163
  6. Consider the production of ammonia from nitrogen and hydrogen,

    Found on Page 152
  7. The first excited energy level of a hydrogen atom has an energy of 10.2 eV, if we take the ground-state energy to be zero. However, the first excited level is really four independent states, all with the same energy. We can therefore assign it an entropy of , since for this given value of the energy, the multiplicity is 4. Question: For what temperatures is the Helmholtz free energy of a hydrogen atom in the first excited level positive, and for what temperatures is it negative? (Comment: When F for the level is negative, the atom will spontaneously go from the ground state into that level, since F=0 for the ground state and F always tends to decrease. However, for a system this small, the conclusion is only a probabilistic statement; random fluctuations will be very significant.)

    Found on Page 163
  8. Is heat capacity (C) extensive or intensive? What about specific heat (c) ? Explain briefly.

    Found on Page 166
  9. Use the data at the back of this book to verify the values of and quoted above for the lead-acid reaction 5.13.

    Found on Page 155
  10. In a hydrogen fuel cell, the steps of the chemical reaction are

    Found on Page 155

Related Physics Textbooks with Solutions

94% of StudySmarter users get better grades.

Sign up for free
94% of StudySmarter users get better grades.